University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Seminars at the Department of Biochemistry >  DISCOVERY AND QUALIFICATION OF CANDIDATE URINARY BIOMARKERS OF DISEASE ACTIVITY IN LUPUS NEPHRITIS

DISCOVERY AND QUALIFICATION OF CANDIDATE URINARY BIOMARKERS OF DISEASE ACTIVITY IN LUPUS NEPHRITIS

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Lupus nephritis (LN) is a severe clinical manifestation of systemic lupuserythematosus (SLE) associated with significant morbidity and mortality.Assessment of severity and activity of renal involvement in SLE requiresa kidney biopsy, an invasive procedure with limited prognostic value. A need remains for non-invasive biomarkers to help inform treatment decisions and to monitor disease activity and progression. Proteinuria, or high levels of protein in urine, is associated with disease progression in LN,however, the composition of the urinary proteome of LN patients remains incompletely characterized. To better understand the urinary LN proteome,we performed a proteomics study to identify urinary biomarkers of LN. Urine samples from three patients with biopsy-confirmed LN and high proteinuria (>3 mg/mmol), and low serum complement C3 ( SDS -PAGE gel fractionation, a chemical labelling approach using tandem mass tags (TMT), and a label free data-independent acquisition (DIA) method. Combining results from both TMT and DIA analyses yielded quantitative information on 2,573 unique proteins in urine from LN patients. In total, 496 proteins were significantly up-regulated in LN samples compared to HC by at least one method, and 41 proteins were found to be significantly up-regulated in LN urine compared to HC by both TMT and DIA approaches (p-value

This talk is part of the Seminars at the Department of Biochemistry series.

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