University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Cambridge University Astronomical Society (CUAS) > How to hunt for dark matter: telescopes, lab experiments, colliders, and putting it all together.

How to hunt for dark matter: telescopes, lab experiments, colliders, and putting it all together.

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Hannah Sanderson.

I spend my days trying to put together the results of many different experimental searches for dark matter and other new particles. These range from the Large Hadron Collider to smaller accelerators, gamma-ray telescopes, cosmic antimatter probes, ultra-clean experiments in the world’s deepest mines, and a neutrino telescope embedded in the Antarctic ice. I’ll explain how these very different probes each get at the dark matter problem in a different way, and then describe GAMBIT , the Global and Modular Beyond-the-Standard-Model Inference Tool, a project that combines them all and applies them to a wide range of different theories for dark matter’s identity.

Come along to our second talk of the year to hear from astroparticlephysicist Pat Scott! Tickets are £2 or free for members. Annual membership (£7) and life membership (£12) can also be purchased at the event – please bring cash.

The talk will be followed by refreshments outside the lecture theatre.

The talk will be at the usual location of Wolfson lecture theatre in the Department of Chemistry. The entrance is the opposite side of the building to Bristol-Myers-Squibb Lecture theatre and is opposite the car park- shown by the red arrow on the map. https://map.cam.ac.uk/Department+of+Chemistry#52.197964,0.125242,18

This talk is part of the Cambridge University Astronomical Society (CUAS) series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity