University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Slavonic Studies > Third Annual Public Lecture in Medieval & Early Modern Slavonic Studies: A Twelfth-Century Slavonic Ekphrasis of Hippodrome Scenes in the Cathedral of St. Sophia in Kyiv?

Third Annual Public Lecture in Medieval & Early Modern Slavonic Studies: A Twelfth-Century Slavonic Ekphrasis of Hippodrome Scenes in the Cathedral of St. Sophia in Kyiv?

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact slavonic.

Third Annual Public Lecture in Medieval and Early Modern Slavonic Studies Lecture in collaboration with the Byzantine Worlds Seminar

Sponsored: CRASSH and Cambridge Ukrainian Studies

Robert Romanchuk is a philologist. He has published the monograph Byzantine Hermeneutics and Pedagogy in the Russian North: Monks and Masters at the Kirillo-Belozerskii Monastery, 1397–1501 (U. Toronto Press, 2007) and a number of book chapters and journal publications, most recently chapters on the literature of Mount Athos for David Wallace’s Europe: A Literary History, 1348–1418 (Oxford UP, 2016) and on “lettered education” in Kyivan Rus for the English translation of Mykhailo Hrushevsky’s History of Ukraine-Rus’, vol. 3 (ed. Frank Sysyn: CIUS , 2016). He is preparing a critical edition of the Byzantine romantic epic Digenis Akritis in its Old Slavonic translation, The Deeds of the Brave Men of Old. He also works in psychoanalysis and literature.

Brad Hostetler is an art historian whose research focuses on relics and reliquaries, text and image relationships, and patronage practices in the Byzantine Empire. He has held fellowships at Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. His current book project examines the design and use of reliquaries in Byzantium after Iconoclasm and before the Fourth Crusade. He looks at the ways in which these objects mediated the viewer’s access to, and veneration of, sacred matter in personal devotion and public ceremonial.

This talk is part of the Slavonic Studies series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity