University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Craik Club > "Visual processing differences in migraine, between attacks, and their links with environmental visual triggers. From the retina to cortex."

"Visual processing differences in migraine, between attacks, and their links with environmental visual triggers. From the retina to cortex."

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Many researchers have assessed visual processing in migraine due to the intense sensitivity to light that patients experience (photophobia), the visual disturbances that may precede an attack (visual aura), and the fact that visual stimuli can trigger attacks in up to 60% of patients (typically, stripes and flicker). Visual tests can be used as non-invasive tools to test models of the pathophysiology underlying various neurological conditions, including migraine. The nature of the tasks used previously in migraine research indicate distributed processing differences, between attacks, throughout the visual pathways from the retina to the primary visual cortex and extrastriate cortical areas. In this talk, I will review the literature in this area and end with comments about its usefulness informing the design of the environment in which we live and enabling patients to predict impending attacks.

This talk is part of the Craik Club series.

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