University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Darwin College Sciences Group > Hearing and seeing things that are not there: Quantifying brain structure related to hallucinations

Hearing and seeing things that are not there: Quantifying brain structure related to hallucinations

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Hallucinations involve perceptions of stimuli that do not exist in the physical world, such as hearing voices or seeing visions. Hallucinations occur not only in schizophrenia, but are experienced by people with other psychiatric disorders, neurological and neurodegenerative conditions, and among the general population. Advances in neuroimaging technology have given insights into the brain structures and functions that are associated with hallucinations, but our understanding of why people experience hallucinations remains incomplete. In this talk I will explore the brain mechanisms underlying hallucinations, the role of reality monitoring – the cognitive capacity to distinguish between internally- and externally-generated information, and how understanding the brain basis of hallucinations can contribute to theoretical accounts of hallucinations, optimize treatment strategies, and inform how we perceive our external world and determine what is real.

This talk is part of the Darwin College Sciences Group series.

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