University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Computational and Systems Biology > CCBI Annual Symposium 2019

CCBI Annual Symposium 2019

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Gos Micklem.

Secure a place at this year’s Annual Symposium of the Cambridge Computational Biology Institute on Wednesday 15 May 2019 at the Centre for Mathematical Sciences.

This one-day event reflects the strength and diversity of research in computational biology, taken broadly, both within Cambridge University and beyond.

Registration and full programme here:

http://bit.ly/2019ccbi

Confirmed speakers:

  • Neil Dalchau (Microsoft Research) Programming DNA circuits
  • Edwin Dalmaijer (MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit) Using machine-learning to map the complex interplay between cognition, mental health, attitude, socio-economic status, and educational outcomes in a large sample of children aged 7-9
  • Diana Fusco (Physics) How space constrains evolution: insights from microbial colonies
  • Erik Garrison (UCSC) Untangling the pangenome
  • Daniel Herranz (Chronomics) Adventures of a PhD student as a start-up founder: the Chronomics story
  • Michael Imbeault (Genetics) KRAB zinc finger proteins, transposable elements and the evolution of gene regulatory networks
  • Naomi Penfold (ASAPbio) Preprints in Computational Biology – where are we at and what’s next?
  • David Shorthouse (MRC Cancer Unit) Computational Methods Reveal Functional Roles for Ion Channels in Cancer
  • Keynote: Rich Turner (Engineering) Extending the frontiers of deep learning using probabilistic modelling

Plus talks from two members of the Wellcome Trust Mathematical Genomics and Medicine PhD programme.

Includes:
  • Coffee from 8.30
  • Lunch
  • Drinks ~17.05-18.00

This talk is part of the Computational and Systems Biology series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity