University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Departmental Seminar Programme, Department of Veterinary Medicine > Equine Rotavirus Diarrhoea in Neonates: Situation in Argentina and optimisation of prevention and therapeutic methods

Equine Rotavirus Diarrhoea in Neonates: Situation in Argentina and optimisation of prevention and therapeutic methods

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Diarrhoea in foals is one of the most important clinical conditions for sport horse breeding establishments. The principal causal agent of diarrhoea in foals is Equine Rotavirus group A, with two different variants, G3P [12] and G14P [12], distributed throughout the world. In intensive breeding establishments in Argentina, the morbidity of rotavirus diarrhoea in foals is around 30%. Argentina is the fourth largest producer of Thoroughbred horses in the world, and the largest producer of Polo horses, thus losses caused by outbreaks of Rotavirus diarrhoea in foals are economically significant. Prevention of rotavirus diarrhoea is based on vaccination of pregnant mares, with a vaccine containing Equine Rotavirus group A. This was previously developed by our group and transferred to the industry in 1996. This vaccine only contains the strain G3P [12], which was the most predominant strain circulating. However, during recent years, an increased prevalence of the G14P [12] strain has been observed. Our group is currently working to reduce incidence of rotavirus in foals by two methods; firstly by generating a vaccine containing both circulating strains of Equine Rotavirus, and secondly by developing a passive immune strategy based on IgY antibodies, to be used in those foals in which a failure in transfer of immunity from the mare has occurred.

This talk is part of the Departmental Seminar Programme, Department of Veterinary Medicine series.

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