University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Optoelectronics Group > Molecular strategies to increase robustness of organic semiconductor thin films for application in photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical devices

Molecular strategies to increase robustness of organic semiconductor thin films for application in photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical devices

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact .

As organic semiconductors attract increasing attention to application in diverse fields such as bioelectronics and artificial photosynthesis, understanding and improving their robust operation in a variety of challenging environments is a critical task. In this presentation, results from our lab are highlighted including our development of a morphology control strategy using conjugation-break spacers [1], demonstration of melt-processed small-molecule OPVs [2], and investigations of covalently-linked block3 and network polymers4, which afford tunable charge transport and solvent tolerance—making them promising for application as charge-transport interlayers in all-solution processed devices. In addition, the application of bulk-heterojunctions to artificial photosynthesis via photoelectrochemical water splitting5 will be discussed in terms of the requirements for material stability. In this regard, our recent work in understanding the roles of charge transport and accumulation at the organic semiconductor/electrolyte interface has led to significant advances in the stability and performance of organic semiconductor photocathodes for direct solar water reduction into hydrogen. [1] Adv. Mater. 2015, 27, 5541. [2] Green Chem. 2018, 20, 2218. [3] ACS Macro Lett. 2019, 8, 134. [4] Adv. Funct. Mater. 2018, 28, 1706303. [5] Adv. Energy Mater. 2018, 1802585.

This talk is part of the Optoelectronics Group series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2020 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity