University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Darwin College Sciences Group > De novo assembly of next-generation sequencing technologies using de Bruijn graphs

De novo assembly of next-generation sequencing technologies using de Bruijn graphs

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Dr James Kirkbride.

Next-generation sequencing technologies are currently bringing about a revolution in the way genomic sequencing is used in biology. Thanks to this tremendous reduction in costs, many DNA -based assays are now within reach of even modest research groups, and new ones are being quickly developed.

However, these technologies have the drawback of reading only very short fragments. These ‘reads’ can easily be mapped onto a known reference genome, but are much more difficult to handle in the case of unstudied species.

I will be presenting Velvet, a software package which allows users to reconstruct, or assemble, new genomes using these very short reads only. I will describe the theory behind Velvet, and especially its data structure, the de Bruijn graph. This kind of graph has is not only very useful in genome assembly, but also in analysing large scale rearrangements in the genome.

This talk is part of the Darwin College Sciences Group series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity