University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > The Cambridge Russian-Speaking Society (CamRuSS) > Russian Poetry of the Second World War, a talk by Dr Maria Bloshteyn with poetry readings in Russian and English and Q&As - Thursday, 22 Oct, 19:00

Russian Poetry of the Second World War, a talk by Dr Maria Bloshteyn with poetry readings in Russian and English and Q&As - Thursday, 22 Oct, 19:00

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  • UserDr Maria Bloshteyn
  • ClockThursday 22 October 2020, 19:00-20:30
  • HouseZoom.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Ksenia Afonina.

The canon of Russian World War II poetry has continued unchallenged for 75 years after the victory over Nazi Germany. What were the reasons for the enormous output of war poems in the Soviet Union during WWII ? Which poets and poems continue to be excluded from Russian poetry anthologies of the Great Patriotic War? We will look at some specific examples of excluded poets and their poems from a new bilingual anthology of Russian WWII poetry Russia is Burning: Poems of the Great Patriotic War (published by Smokestack Books).

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We look forward to seeing you online soon! CamRuSS

WHEN : Thursday, 22 October, 19:00-20:30

WHERE : Zoom

LANGUAGE : English (with some poems being read in Russian).

TICKETS : Free*

Please register in advance for this event here:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZErd-qqrz4vHNO6ygwZUBnBROLQVJHCuALn

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

About the speaker Maria Bloshteyn was born in Leningrad (St. Petersburg) and emigrated to Canada when she was nine years old. She received her PhD from Toronto’s York University and was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University, where she examined Dostoevsky’s impact on American literature and culture. She is the author of The Making of a Counter-Culture Icon: Henry Miller’s Dostoevsky (2007) and the translator of Alexander Galich’s Dress Rehearsal (2009) and Anton Chekhov’s The Prank (2015). Her translations have also appeared in a number of journals and anthologies, including The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry (Penguin Classics, 2015).

This talk is part of the The Cambridge Russian-Speaking Society (CamRuSS) series.

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