University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Fluid Mechanics (CUED) > Probing density-stratified turbulence and mixing using simultaneous volumetric Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF)

Probing density-stratified turbulence and mixing using simultaneous volumetric Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF)

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

  • UserDr. Adrien Lefauve (DAMTP)
  • ClockFriday 18 February 2022, 12:30-13:30
  • HouseCUED, LT6.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact .

What are the properties of density-stratified, shear-driven turbulence? The turbulent mixing of air or water masses that have even slightly different physico-chemical composition (e.g. temperature, salinity) is crucial to many engineering and geophysical flows, from the ventilation in buildings, to the dispersion of pollutants in rivers, to the large-scale thermohaline ocean circulation regulating our climate.

Given the complexity of the problem, laboratory experiments play a crucial role to fill the gap between direct field observations and numerical modelling. The Stratified Inclined Duct (SID) is a canonical experiment designed to study the long-term behaviour of stably-stratified turbulence continuously forced by shear. This is achieved by setting up a two-layer exchange flow in a long rectangular duct connecting two large reservoirs containing different salt solutions.

I will introduce a new generation of experiments developed in the G. K. Laboratory in DAMTP to advance our understanding of these flows. These experiments rely on a new technique to measure the density field and the three-component velocity field simultaneously in three-dimensional volumes at high spatio-temporal resolutions. This technique employs a thin, pulsed vertical laser sheet that is scanned rapidly back and forth to span a three-dimensional sub-volume. We then combine successive planar measurements of stereo particle image velocimetry (sPIV) and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to re-construct three-dimensional volumes having full velocity and density data.

I will also give a few examples of advances that have been made possible by these new measurements. I will also outline what future improvements could bring to our study of stratified turbulence and mixing.

This talk is part of the Fluid Mechanics (CUED) series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2022 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity