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Chromatin: How a cell fits 10,000 miles of spaghetti into a basketball

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Dr James Kirkbride.

If linearised, the amount of DNA in a human cell would stretch 2m, yet this must be contained in a space 6-thousandths of a millimeter in diameter, equivalent to stuffing 10,000 miles of spaghetti into a basket ball without any of it tangling or breaking. Amazingly, the structure that allows this compaction called chromatin is also able to influence whether genes are switched on or off, how often a cell divides, and how new cells can ‘remember’ exactly what and when they are supposed to do. This talk will explore the what’s and when’s of this remarkable complex.

This talk is part of the Darwin College Sciences Group series.

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