University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > CBU one-off Talks > Speech perception in a probabilistic world: the role of phonetic detail and language experience in compensation for assimilation

Speech perception in a probabilistic world: the role of phonetic detail and language experience in compensation for assimilation

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The speech signal is notoriously variable and complex. Not only do listeners cope well with this variability and complexity, they display exquisite sensitivity to the co-occurrence and predictability of fine grained aspects of the speech signal. In this talk I will discuss one such example – variability in the place of articulation at the beginnings and ends of words which is conditioned on the immediate phonetic context (place assimilation) and listeners’ abilities to make use of this information (compensation and prediction). By comparing patterns of variability in production and perception across two languages (French and English) I will discuss the role of language experience in listeners’ behaviour. Furthermore, the temporal dynamics of word recognition in this case will be examined by monitoring eye-movements using the visual world paradigm.

This talk is part of the CBU one-off Talks series.

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