University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Land Economy Seminar Series > An Introduction to Economic Models of Population-Resource Dynamics with Systems Analysis

An Introduction to Economic Models of Population-Resource Dynamics with Systems Analysis

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

  • UserDr Yoko Nagase from the Department of Economics and International Business, Oxford Brookes University Business School
  • ClockFriday 21 May 2010, 13:00-14:00
  • HouseLaundress Lane Seminar Room 1.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Ellen Ihrig.

About the speaker:

Dr Yoko Nagase is currently Senior Lecturer, Dept. of Economics and International Business, Oxford Brookes University Business School. She was formerly Distinguished Visiting Sustainability Scholar, Center for Sustainable Processes and Practices, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon. Her research interests include environmental and resource economics. Recent project topics include: simulation model design and analysis for renewable resources and population system dynamics, construction and analysis of Californian carbon market compliance cost calculator as a team member of the Carbon Modeling Group, and modelling of recyclable product markets and take-back programs (e.g., Japanese recycling programs and Packaging waste Recovery Notes of the UK). She has a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Oregon.

About the seminar:

There is a group of models of population and resource dynamics called the BT-type models because the models are the descendants of the initial model by Brander and Taylor (1999). In contrast to traditional macroeconomic growth models that focus on benevolent social planners’ infinite-time optimization in a centralized manner, in the BT-type models individuals behave in a decentralized manner (i.e., interacting with each other through markets) and are concerned about the present and near future. Feedback mechanisms between these economic agents’ behaviour and the population and resource growth from one period to another allow us to study the fluctuation of these stock variables and individuals’ well-being over time. This approach does not guarantee a steady-state and allows for the potential that the modelled economy can outgrow its supporting ecosystems. This seminar will compare the BT model and its descendants from the following perspectives: (1) population growth functions, (2) substitutability between man-made and natural goods/inputs, (3) treatment of innovation, (4) capital accumulation, (5) property rights, and (6) overall modelling approach.

This talk is part of the Land Economy Seminar Series series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2017 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity