University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Computer Laboratory Systems Research Group Seminar > Adapting and assembling components using Cake, a language of interface relations

Adapting and assembling components using Cake, a language of interface relations

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Eiko Yoneki.

There is little tool support for composing software components whose interfaces do not match, yet this arises often. Observing the typical benefits and drawbacks of glue coding, I will outline the design of Cake, a rule-based language for describing black-box compositions of native binary components whose interfaces do not match. I will discuss briefly the implementation of the Cake compiler, which generates adaptation logic, and the Cake runtime, which addresses binary compatibility issues. Finally I will describe experiences applying Cake to three real use-cases drawn from open-source code, illustrating how the Cake code is shorter, simpler and better modularised than conventional implementations.

This is a practice talk for SPLASH / OOPSLA 2010.

This talk is part of the Computer Laboratory Systems Research Group Seminar series.

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