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Prospects for studying how high-intensity compression waves cause damage in human blast injuries

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The use of Improvised Explosive Devices against security forces in the current conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq have resulted in severely injured casualties with complex musculoskeletal injuries. Understanding the damage that high intensity compression waves induce in human tissues is critical for developing improved therapies for patients suffering from blast injuries. Given the inherent heterogeneities in the human body, we are taking a highly integrated approach involving expertise in shock physics, biomechanics and fundamental biology to understand the processes involved in the transfer of blast-induced shock waves through biological tissues and the subsequent damage that occurs.

This talk is part of the Surfaces, Microstructure and Fracture Group series.

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