University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Martin Centre Research Seminar Series - 42nd Annual Series of Lunchtime Lectures > Localised Planning, Sub-regional Housing Markets and Affordability Outcomes: What is Likely to Happen?

Localised Planning, Sub-regional Housing Markets and Affordability Outcomes: What is Likely to Happen?

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Peter Armitage.

Abstract: After half a decade of strong ‘top down’ policy and planning to promote housing supply and affordability in England, we have from 2010 an abrupt change of policy. Decisions are to be devolved to local level, with no more government targets and the dismantling of regional planning. A financial bonus is intended to incentivize local authorities to agree to additional house-building. It is quite unclear a priori how this system will work, so it may be regarded as a large-scale social-economic (and environmental) experiment. This paper will utilise a new subregional economic market model to explore the affordability implications of different patterns of local decision-making on housing land supply. It will also feed in a predicted pattern of local decisions based on new opinion survey evidence and political voting patterns.

Biography: Glen Bramley is Professor of Urban Studies at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, where he leads a substantial research programme in housing and urban studies. Recent work is focused particularly on planning for new housing, housing need, home ownership, neighbourhood change, urban form, quality of life, poverty and the funding and outcomes of local services. His publications include Key Issues in Housing (Palgrave 2005), and Planning, the Market and Private Housebuilding (UCL Press 1995).

This talk is part of the Martin Centre Research Seminar Series - 42nd Annual Series of Lunchtime Lectures series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity