University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > BPI Seminar Series > On the propagation of non-isothermal gravity currents in an inclined porous layer / Propulsion in Stokes flow

On the propagation of non-isothermal gravity currents in an inclined porous layer / Propulsion in Stokes flow

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Helen Mawdsley.

On the propagation of non-isothermal gravity currents in an inclined porous layer

We consider the buoyancy-driven flow in an inclined porous layer which results when fluid of diff erent temperature and composition to that in the reservoir is injected from a horizontal line well. The thermal inertia of the porous matrix leads to a transition in the temperature of the injectate as it spreads from the well and heats up to reservoir temperature. Since the buoyancy and viscosity of the injectate changes across this thermal transition, the alongslope characteristic speed of the current also changes. The change in characteristic speed, combined with the change in buoyancy across the thermal transition, leads to a series of different flow morphologies with the thermally adjusted injectate either running ahead of or lagging behind the original injectate. We consider the implications of the models for several industrial processes including geothermal heat recovery, aquifer thermal storage and CO2 sequestration.

Will Rayward-Smith, BP Institute, University of Cambridge

Propulsion in Stokes flow

The swimming of micro-organisms has been a benchmark problem in low-Reynolds number flow for the past 60 years. In particular, the study of eukaryotic flagellar motion, characterised by active bending along the tail, has led to the development of the Resistive Force Theory and powerful singularity methods based upon the Stokeslet. The motor apparatus of eukaryotic flagella and cilia, the axoneme, is one of the most evolutionarily robust structures in all of nature, being almost identical in all organisms from single-celled algae to humans. Understanding the complicated fluid-structure interaction by which these motors drive fluid will give invaluable insight into a variety of medical conditions, from infertility to situs inversus. I intend to give an overview of a few of the current research problems in the area, along with the methods being used to solve them.

Tom Johnson, University of Birmingham

This talk is part of the BPI Seminar Series series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity