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Content delivery in the Internet: an infrastructure-oriented perspective.

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  • UserSteve Uhlig, Professor of Networks, School of electronic engineering and computer science, Queen Mary, University of London
  • ClockWednesday 02 May 2012, 14:15-15:15
  • HouseLecture Theatre 1, Computer Laboratory.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Stephen Clark.

 With the recent deployment of data-centers across the Internet, more and more services, such as content delivery, are being delivered from massively distributed infrastructures. This ecosystem is difficult to measure and track, and despite the importance of understanding its evolution, not much is known about it. In this talk, we’ll review the extent of the deployment of content delivery infrastructures in today’s Internet and discuss the implications on the evolution of the Internet infrastructure.

  Bio: Steve Uhlig is the Professor of Networks at Queen Mary, University of London, and the head of the networks group. He obtained a Ph.D. degree in Applied Sciences from the University of Louvain, Belgium, in 2004. From 2004 to 2006, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow of the Belgian National Fund for Scientific Research (F.N.R.S.). His thesis won the annual IBM Belgium/F.N.R.S. Computer Science Prize 2005. Between 2004 and 2006, he was a visiting scientist at Intel Research Cambridge, UK, and at the Applied Mathematics Department of University of Adelaide, Australia. Between 2006 and 2008, he was with Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands. Prior to joining Queen Mary, he was a Senior Research Scientist  with Technische Universitat Berlin/Deutsche Telekom Laboratories, Berlin, Germany. His current research interests revolve around Internet measurements, software-defined networking, content delivery, and network infrastructure virtualization.   

This talk is part of the Computer Laboratory Wednesday Seminars series.

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