University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Centre of Governance and Human Rights Events > ’Demand Driven Democratisation – the work of the UN Democracy Fund’

’Demand Driven Democratisation – the work of the UN Democracy Fund’

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Gabriela Martinez.

The Cambridge International Studies Association (CISA) and the University of Cambridge, Centre of Governance and Human Rights (CGHR) are delighted to announce a talk by Dr Roland Rich, Executive Head of the United Nations Democracy Fund on ’Demand Driven Democratisation – the work of the UN Democracy Fund’. The talk and the discussion following it will be an opportunity to learn more about the UN’s work in democracy promotion and to discuss it with a practitioner that also works academically. The talk will take place at 5pm on 28 May in Seminar room 2 (2nd floor) in the Alison Richard Building. The talk will be chaired by Sir Tony Brenton, former British Ambassador to Russia and member of the Governing Body of Wolfson College.

The United Nations Democracy Fund (UNDEF) was established by the UN Secretary-General in 2005 to support democratization efforts around the world. UNDEF supports projects that strengthen the voice of civil society, promote human rights, and encourage the participation of all groups in democratic processes. The large majority of UNDEF funds go to local civil society organizations—both in the transition and consolidation phases of democratization. In this way, UNDEF plays a novel and unique role in complementing the UN’s traditional work—the work with Governments—to strengthen democratic governance around the world. UNDEF is funded by voluntary contributions from Governments; in 2010, it surpassed 110 million dollars in contributions and now counts 39 countries as donors. For more information on the United Nations Democracy Fund and its work, please visit http://www.un.org/democracyfund/

Roland Rich will give a second talk on ’Southeast Asia’s Experiment with Non-Partisan Parliamentary Chambers’ on 29 May at 1pm in the same room (S2, ARB ). The talk is hosted by CISA with the Cambridge University Southeast Asia Forum. It is based on his forthcoming Routledge “book”: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415629324/)

A short biography of Dr Roland Rich: Dr. Roland Rich served in the Australian Foreign Office for 23 years including posts as Legal Adviser, Assistant Secretary for International Organisations and Ambassador to Laos. He also served in Paris, Rangoon and Manila. Dr Rich joined the Australian National University in 1998 as Foundation Director of the Centre for Democratic Institutions. He has also taught at the Australian Defence University and was a research Fellow at the National Endowment for Democracy in Washington DC. Dr. Rich has contributed to the scholarly literature on democracy and democracy promotion. In 2004, together with Edward Newman, he edited a publication entitled The UN Role in Promoting Democracy published by United Nations University Press which examined the areas of comparative advantage the UN had in this field. In 2007, Pacific Asia in Quest of Democracywas published by Lynne Rienner – it surveys the current state of democratic consolidation among the countries along Asia’s Pacific Rim. His most recent book, Parties and Parliaments in Southeast Asia – Non-Partisan Chambers in Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand is due for publication by Routledge in the summer of 2012.

He holds BA and LLB (hons) degrees from the University of Sydney and Master of International law and PhD degrees from the Australian National University.

This talk is part of the CISA Talks – Cambridge International Studies Association series.

This talk is part of the Centre of Governance and Human Rights Events series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2017 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity