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Studies of the human brain during experimental and natural conditions using intracranial recordings and electrical brain stimulation

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PLEASE NOTE: THIS TALK HAS BEEN CHANGED TO THURSDAY 13TH MARCH INSTEAD OF THE USUAL FRIDAY" THIS IS A SPECIAL EXTRA ZANGWILL CLUB SEMINAR"

Human brain is traditionally studied in controlled experimental conditions wherein confounds of the natural environment are intentionally eliminated. Given the complexity of environmental factors and social interactions in our real life, the modes of brain function in natural conditions remain largely unknown. This presentation will include a historical overview of localization of functions in the brain and a review of some of the most recent findings with intracranial recordings and electrical brain stimulations in patients undergoing neurosurgical evaluations.

BIO Josef Parvizi is an Associate Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University and specializes in the field of epilepsy surgery with interest in functional mapping of the brain using a combination of functional imaging, intracranial EEG , and electrical brain stimulation. Parvizi graduated from the University of Oslo with MD Cum Laude in 1996 and earned his PhD in neurosciences from the University of Iowa in 1999. He completed his medical internship at Mayo Clinic, neurology residency at Harvard, and epilepsy fellowship at UCLA . He has earned numerous teaching and research awards and his research is currently funded by the National Institute of Health (NIH) and National Science Foundation (NSF) as well as several private foundation grants.

This talk is part of the Zangwill Club series.

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