University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Synthetic Chemistry Research Interest Group > From Molecules to Microelectrode Arrays: Using Electrochemistry to Solve Problems of Structure and Location

From Molecules to Microelectrode Arrays: Using Electrochemistry to Solve Problems of Structure and Location

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Chloe Barker.

Electrochemistry is a powerful tool that can be used to selectively reverse the polarity of known functional groups, solve challenging synthetic problems, and probe the mechanism of reactive intermediates in new ways. Interestingly, the connection between electrochemistry and synthesis also works well in the opposite direction. Organic synthesis is a powerful tool that can be used to selectively functionalize electrodes and solve challenging analytical problems in new ways. In the seminar to be presented, the interplay between electrochemistry and organic synthesis will be examined in order to shed light on how a combination of the technologies provides both new methods for the construction of organic molecules and new approaches for the evaluation of small molecule – receptor interactions.

Professor Kevin D. Moeller has been on the faculty at Washington University in St. Louis for 26 years. His group has published over 120 papers and made over 110 presentations at scientific meetings. Professor Moeller has presented over 145 invited seminars and lecturers. He is a member of the Executive Committee for the Organic and Biological Electrochemistry Division of The Electrochemical Society, was named Washington University’s Professor of the Year in 2001, and has won the St. Louis Award from the ACS for his contributions to organic chemistry.

This talk is part of the Synthetic Chemistry Research Interest Group series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity