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Mechanics of Stretchable Electronics

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  • UserProfessor Yonggang Huang, Joseph Cummings Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University
  • ClockThursday 10 April 2014, 14:30-15:30
  • House Cambridge University Engineering Department, LR4.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Ms Helen Gardner.

Please note that this is a Mechanics Colloquia

Recent advances in mechanics and materials provide routes to integrated circuits that can offer the electrical properties of conventional, rigid wafer-based technologies but with the ability to be stretched, compressed, twisted, bent and deformed into arbitrary shapes. Inorganic electronic materials in micro/nanostructured forms, intimately integrated with elastomeric substrates offer particularly attractive characteristics in such systems, with realistic pathways to sophisticated embodiments. Mechanics plays a key role in this development by identifying the underlying mechanism and providing analytical solutions to guide design and fabrication. I will present our research on the enabling technology (transfer printing [1]) and materials (stretchable silicon, [2,3], interconnect [4]), and their applications to stretchable and foldable circuits [5], electronic-eye camera [6,7], solar cell [8], semi-transparent and flexible LED [9] and its application to medicine [10], neural [11] and cardiac sensors [12], cardiac ablation therapy [13], epidermal electronics [14] with applications to human skin [15], flexible electrode array for mapping brain activity in vivo [16,17], dissolvable electronics [18], carbon nanotubes [19], battery [20], pressure sensor [21], antenna [22], and injectable, cellular-scale optoelectronics [23]. Review of stretchable electronics has been published [24].

1. Meitl et al., Nature Materials 5, p 33, 2006 (cover article). 2. Khang et al., Science 311, p 208, 2006. 3. Sun et al., Nature Nanotechnology 1, p 201, 2006. 4. Park et al., Nature Communications 3:916 doi: 10.1038/ ncomms1929, 2012. 5. Kim et al., Science 320, p 507, 2008 (inner cover article). 6. Ko et al., Nature 454, p 748, 2008 (cover article). 7. Song et al., Nature 497, 95-99, 2013 (cover article). 8. Yoon et al., Nature Materials 7, p 907, 2008 (cover article). 9. Park et al., Science 325, p 977, 2009. 10. Kim et al., Nature Materials 9, p 929, 2010. 11. Kim et al., Nature Materials 9, p 511, 2010 (cover article). 12. Viventi et al., Science Translational Medicine 2, 24ra22, 2010 (cover article). 13. Kim et al., Nature Materials 10, 316-323, 2011. 14. Kim et al., Science 333, p 838, 2011. 15. Webb et al., Nature Materials 12, p 938, 2013. 16. Viventi et al., Nature Neuroscience 14, p 1599, 2011. 17. Xu et al., Nature Communications (in press), 2014. 18. Hwang et al., Science 337, 1640-1644, 2012 (cover article). 19. Jin et al., Nature Nanotechnology 8, 347-355, 2013. 20. Xu et al., Nature Communications 4:1543 doi: 10.1038/ncomms2553, 2013. 21. Persano et al., Nature Communications 4:1633 doi: 10.1038/ncomms2639, 2013. 22. Fan et al., Nature Communications (in press), 2014. 23. Kim et al., Science 340, 211-216, 2013. 24. Rogers et al., Science 327, p 1603, 2010.

This talk is part of the Engineering Department Bio- and Micromechanics Seminars series.

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