University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Department of German and Dutch > How did Racism and Anti-Semitism become Mental Illnesses? — From Freud’s Vienna to Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas

How did Racism and Anti-Semitism become Mental Illnesses? — From Freud’s Vienna to Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas

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  • UserProf Sander L. Gilman (Distinguished Professor of the Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Professor of Psychiatry, Emory University)
  • ClockThursday 22 May 2014, 18:00-19:30
  • HouseUpper Hall, Jesus College, Cambridge.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Ulrike Balser.

In 2012, an interdisciplinary team of scientists at the University of Oxford reported the results of a drug trial, which claimed that a drug could reduce implicit racial bias among its users. Shortly after the experiment, an article in Time Magazine, citing the study, asked the question: Is racism becoming a mental illness? But the idea of racism as a mental illness is much older, having its roots in the genealogies of race and racism as psychopathological categories from mid-19th century Europe and the United States up to today. From the early Zionists to Freud and then from Adorno through Fanon, racism became a mental illness. But what did this imply?

This talk is part of the Department of German and Dutch series.

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