University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Faculty of Education Research Students' Association (FERSA) Lunchtime Seminars 2014-2015 > The use of think-aloud protocols to explore educators’ understandings of contested concepts

The use of think-aloud protocols to explore educators’ understandings of contested concepts

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Contested subjects like democracy, justice and education itself are commonly used within the classroom but rarely defined. These kind of abstract concepts are usually understood in many different, even contradictory, ways leading to constant disagreements about their meaning, scope and application. Furthermore, the particular ways in which educators define and interpret these concepts can lead to contrasting teaching practices with different implications for the subject content and the learning process. For this reason, and using the concept of human rights as an example, I discuss the challenges and possibilities of examining educators’ understandings of contested concepts. I draw upon previous research on subjective dimensions of human rights advanced by Stenner (2010) to discuss the use of innovative research methods to explore how educators make sense of this kind of concepts.

This talk is part of the Faculty of Education Research Students' Association (FERSA) Lunchtime Seminars 2014-2015 series.

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