University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Biological and Statistical Physics discussion group (BSDG) > What the Bees Know and What They Don’t Know. Meanders on Shape, Packing and Self-Assembly in Nature

What the Bees Know and What They Don’t Know. Meanders on Shape, Packing and Self-Assembly in Nature

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Salvatore Tesoro.

Self-Assembly – the process by which building blocks achieve global order due solely to their local interactions with each other and the environment – is ubiquitous in Nature, from the magic ratio found in most rivers to the shape of viruses. Conceptually similar, packing problems – concerning the densest way of organizing shapes in a container – are also frequently found in Nature and have many connections to self-assembly. Departing from the historical question on “what gives honeycombs their shape”, I will cover the similarities and differences between packing and assembly and reveal how those concepts have been helping the development of new materials in the nano and colloidal scale.

References:

[1] Damasceno, Engel & Glotzer. Science 337 (6093), 453-457 (2012)

[2] Chen, Klotsa, Engel, Damasceno & Glotzer. Phys Rev X 4 , 1 (2013)

This talk is part of the Biological and Statistical Physics discussion group (BSDG) series.

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