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Framing the Austerity Debate

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact pa267.

The next St Catharine’s Political Economy Seminar in the series on the Economics of Austerity, will be held on Wednesday 03 December 2014 – Ha-Joon Chang will give a talk on ‘Framing the Austerity Debate’. The seminar will be held in the McGrath Centre at St Catharine’s College from 6.00-7.30 pm. All are welcome.

HA-JOON CHANG teaches economics at the University of Cambridge. In addition to numerous journal articles and book chapters, he has published 15 authored books (four co-authored) and 10 edited books. His main books include ‘The Political Economy of Industrial Policy’, ‘Kicking Away the Ladder’, ‘Bad Samaritans’, ‘23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism’, and ‘Economics: The User’s Guide’. By the end of 2014, his writings will have been translated and published in 36 languages and 39 countries. Worldwide, his books have sold around 1.5 million copies. He is the winner of the 2003 Gunnar Myrdal Prize and the 2005 Wassily Leontief Prize. He was ranked no. 9 in the ‘Prospect’ magazine’s World Thinkers 2014 poll.

In this seminar, Ha-Joon Chang will discuss how the coalition government has successfully exploited some mistaken popular conceptions about economic issues like debt, deficit, welfare, taxation, regulation, etc. to create a narrative on the inevitability and the virtue of its austerity drive. He will further argue that the austerity narrative is more importantly hiding a more radical agenda of restructuring the British economy and society, completing the unfinished Thatcherite revolution.

Please contact the seminar organisers Philip Arestis (pa267@cam.ac.uk) and Michael Kitson (m.kitson@jbs.cam.ac.uk) in the event of a query.

This talk is part of the St Catharine's Political Economy Seminars series.

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