University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Biological and Statistical Physics discussion group (BSDG) > Ligand-mediated interactions between lipid vesicle: tuneable porosity and negative thermal expansion in lipid-DNA phases.

Ligand-mediated interactions between lipid vesicle: tuneable porosity and negative thermal expansion in lipid-DNA phases.

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Salvatore Tesoro.

In the last decade DNA has become routinely used to drive the self-assembly of Brownian objects, including colloids an nanoparticles. In these systems, the particles are coated with DNA tethers, that bind to each other via selective and reversible Watson-Crick be pairing. Recently the same approach has been applied to more compliant units, including emulsion droplets and lipid vesicles. In these systems, the deformability of the substrates couples with the already complex statistical mechanics of multivalent interactions. Moreover, due to the liquid nature of the interfaces, DNA tethers can diffuse and rearrange, giving rise to nontrivial entropic contributions to the free energy. We recently investigated the emergent thermal response of systems of networks of DNA -functionalised lipid vesicles, leading to tuneable porosity and negative thermal expansion [Nature Communications 6:5948 2015]. I will discuss experimental findings and compare them with the predictions of a detailed analytical model. The results highlight the importance of entropic contributions to the coupling between the DNA tethers and the morphology of the substrates.

This talk is part of the Biological and Statistical Physics discussion group (BSDG) series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2017 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity