University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Materials Chemistry Research Interest Group > The Interplay of X-ray Spectroscopy with Functional Materials - Addressing Scientific Issues with Synchrotron Capabilities

The Interplay of X-ray Spectroscopy with Functional Materials - Addressing Scientific Issues with Synchrotron Capabilities

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  • UserProfessor Tsun-Kong Sham, Canadian Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Canada
  • ClockThursday 26 February 2015, 14:30-15:30
  • HouseWolfson Lecture Theatre.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Sian Bunnage.

Information Materials RIG seminar

The advent of maturing synchrotron capabilities and nanotechnology has provided an exciting playground and unprecedented scientific opportunities. The very bright, energy-tunable, highly collimated and pulsed synchrotron light sources of the third generation are making synchrotron light readily available for a wide spectrum of materials research. In this talk, the applications of a number of recently developed synchrotron spectroscopic techniques will be presented. These include: X-ray Absorption Fine Structures (XAFS) using yield techniques, X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES), X-ray Excited Optical Luminescence (XEOL) in both energy and time domain and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). Studies of nano-composites, transition metal nanostructures, energy nanomaterials, such as Li ion battery materials and calcium silicate nano-carriers for drug delivery among others will be described to illustrate the unique solutions the synchrotron technology can provide. The prospects of emerging techniques such as High Energy X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, High Energy Resolution X-ray Fluorescence and Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering Spectroscopy and their applications will also be noted.

This talk is part of the Materials Chemistry Research Interest Group series.

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