University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Computer Laboratory Systems Research Group Seminar > Rethinking State-Machine Replication for Multicore Architectures

Rethinking State-Machine Replication for Multicore Architectures

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The advent of multicore processors and their wide availability is revolutionizing the programming conventions and application development strategies. To benefit from this new hardware, modern programming techniques are emerging and scalability of middleware and operating system is being revisited. However, what remains unchanged in this paradigm is the availability demands of the parallelized services, similar to their sequential predecessors. State-machine replication is one of the popular strategies in making services fault tolerant. In this talk we will look at the capability of state-machine approach in replicating parallel services. On one hand parallel applications require concurrent execution of requests to provide high performance services and on the other, state-machine replication requires sequential execution of requests to preserve consistency. During this presentation we will look at the possibility of uniting these two incompatible models and will propose a solution to achieve it.

Bio: Parisa obtained her bachelor and master degrees in software engineering from IUST and TMU universities in Tehran, and in 2009 she moved to Switzerland to pursue a PhD at the University of Lugano. At the moment, she is a Postdoc at Microsoft Research Cambridge in Systems and Networking group. Her research interests include distributed systems and networking with a focus on fault tolerance and replication.

This talk is part of the Computer Laboratory Systems Research Group Seminar series.

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