University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > MRC Epidemiology and CEDAR Seminars > “Standing up” for young children’s health: How sedentary are young children, what factors may influence sedentariness and what can be done to reduce it?

“Standing up” for young children’s health: How sedentary are young children, what factors may influence sedentariness and what can be done to reduce it?

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Young children spend a large proportion of their day in sedentary behaviour. This may not be good for their physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development. If ways can be found to promote less sedentariness (i.e., sitting) and more standing and light-intensity physical activity this may help young children to be more active, enhance their self-regulation and, ultimately, their school readiness. Higher levels of school readiness have been associated with greater educational and economic outcomes later in life. Promoting less sitting, especially in early childhood education and care settings would involve making some key changes to the physical environment and to policies and practices such as replacing chairs with standing desks, allowing children to move more freely during and between activities, integrating movement into other learning areas (such as literacy and numeracy), and breaking up sitting time with energy breaks. This presentation will describe the prevalence of sitting, its links with health and development, correlates of sitting behaviour, and ways to reduce sitting time in the early years of life.

This talk is part of the MRC Epidemiology and CEDAR Seminars series.

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