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Amateurs and pros(e): growing pains in twentieth century natural history publishing

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A common belief among historians of natural history is that by the late nineteenth century, the development of disciplines had narrowed scientific writing to a professional audience, and that professional scientists no longer wrote for a nonspecialist readership. Not So! Says Peter Bowler (Queen’s University, Belfast). The thin boundary between ‘biologists’ and ‘naturalists’ was still permeable, and there were many early twentieth century professional biologists, , such as Julian Huxley, who presented natural history to a general readership. How did they find their way into the world of non-specialist writing? How did they balance their writing activity against the demands of their professional careers? Professor Bowler enlightens us on an important issue in the development of professional science.

This talk is part of the Cabinet of Natural History series.

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