University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Seminars on Quantitative Biology @ CRUK Cambridge Institute  > Adventures in structural variation and evolution in cancer

Adventures in structural variation and evolution in cancer

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Florian Markowetz.

Cancer is a disease of evolution gone wrong. A major focus of my lab’s work is understanding cancer evolution and developing methods to make sense of this data. In this talk, I will discuss two recent projects aimed at understanding the evolution of two different cancers.

In the first part of the talk, I will discuss published work on cancer-associated neochromosomes. These are massive chromosomes that harbor oncogenic drivers. They are rare overall, but common in certain rare cancers. We sequenced neochromosomes isolated by flow sorting. This data allowed us to map the contents and structure of neochromosomes at high resolution and develop a new model for their formation. In the second part of the talk, I will discuss work in progress on understanding the evolution of advanced metastatic melanoma from a rapid autopsy program at the Peter MacCallum cancer centre and describe some of the hypotheses we’re developing from this data. Along the way, I’ll describe some of the tools we’ve developed to help make sense of the data, especially in the prediction of structural variants.

This talk is part of the Seminars on Quantitative Biology @ CRUK Cambridge Institute series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2017 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity