University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Education, Equality and Development (EED) Group Seminars > WORKSHOP: Sex objects, political subjects or citizen-girls? Using critical, creative and collaborative methods with youth to explore gender, citizenship and schooling & PRESENTATION: Toward policy frameworks for transnational citizenship education

WORKSHOP: Sex objects, political subjects or citizen-girls? Using critical, creative and collaborative methods with youth to explore gender, citizenship and schooling & PRESENTATION: Toward policy frameworks for transnational citizenship education

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WORKSHOP Seldom do youth, and in particular girls, direct the researcher’s gaze or control the camera’s lens. How can a collaborative, critical and creative approach to research help us understand what young people are learning about their roles in society? This workshop will explore the use of participatory, visually-informed research methods that engage youth and attempt to revise power relations employed in more traditional positivist research. This presentation also considers the possibilities of using critical, creative and collaborative methods with youth in the contexts of research, teaching and international development. This workshop will draw on a study called Citizen-Girls, conducted in the Toronto area, which used photovoice to explore ideas about gender with a group of young women. This study examined the myriad of ways that young women are currently resisting, defying and acting as citizens.

PRESENTATION The growing literature on transnationalism has illustrated that policies and practices of citizenship education influenced by notions of social cohesion promote compliance and volunteerism rather than democratic engagement and equity-seeking versions of citizenship. What does transnational citizenship education look like today? This study will examine constructions of transnational citizenship through a critical discourse analysis of educational policy in three countries, Australia, Canada, and India. In this paper, we argue that policy approaches are linked to national security agendas that promote a vision of certain groups as actual or potential threats to security. As we face significant new global challenges to traditional notions of citizenship, identity and belonging, this study raises significant questions about the nature of citizenship in a globalized world and the growing dominance of neoliberal and neoconservative discourses in the definitions of citizenship in education.

This talk is part of the Education, Equality and Development (EED) Group Seminars series.

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