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Cluster management at Google with Borg

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Google’ Borg system is a cluster manager that runs hundreds of thousands of jobs, from many thousands of different applications, across a number of clusters each with up to tens of thousands of machines. It achieves high utilization by combining admission control, efficient task-packing, over-commitment, and machine sharing with process-level performance isolation. It supports high-availability applications with runtime features that minimize fault-recovery time, and scheduling policies that reduce the probability of correlated failures. Borg simplifies life for its users by offering a declarative job specification language, name service integration, real-time job monitoring, and tools to analyse and simulate system behavior. This is a longer version of the EuroSys paper talk on Borg. It’ll include a quick summary of the Borg system architecture and features, provide a quantitative analysis of some of its policy decisions, and then explain how Borg has influenced the open source Kubernetes system.

Bio: John Wilkes has been at Google since 2008, where he is working on cluster management and infrastructure services. Before that, he spent a long time at HP Labs, becoming an HP and ACM Fellow in 2002. He is interested in far too many aspects of distributed systems, but a recurring theme has been technologies that allow systems to manage themselves. In his spare time he continues, stubbornly, trying to learn how to blow glass. http://e-wilkes.com/john

This talk is part of the Computer Laboratory Systems Research Group Seminar series.

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