University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > "Life Sciences Masterclass"  > Sequencing Ebola virus in an insect filled tent; how real-time next generation sequencing aided the epidemic response.

Sequencing Ebola virus in an insect filled tent; how real-time next generation sequencing aided the epidemic response.

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  • UserProfessor Ian Goodfellow (Division of Virology, Department of Pathology) and Dr Matt Cotten (Sanger Centre)
  • ClockWednesday 02 March 2016, 18:30-20:00
  • HousePostdoc Centre, 16 Mill Lane.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Mark Dunning.

The largest known outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa is now being brought under control. A crucial tool in stopping the virus was rapid epidemiological tracing of cases and contacts. Phylogenetics based on Ebola virus (EBOV) genome sequences provided a powerful tool for tracking the virus through the outbreak. To help in the effort, a next generation sequencing facility was established in a tent at an Ebola Treatment Centre in Sierra Leone with full virus genomes obtained from diagnostic samples within 24 hours. The effort generated 554 EBOV genomes from EVD cases across Sierra Leone, >1/3 of the total sequence data available from the outbreak. These data enabled phylogenetic tracking of new EVD cases and provided evidence for unconventional transmission chains involving semen and breast milk body fluids. The coupling of viral phylogenetics with infection control management should therefore form a major part of outbreak emergency responses.

This talk is part of the "Life Sciences Masterclass" series.

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