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Anomalous Diffusion and Random Encounters in Biological Fluids

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SDBW01 - Opening Workshop

The last twenty years have seen a revolution in tracking data of biological agents across unprecedented spatial and temporal scales. An important observation from these studies is that path trajectories of living organisms can appear random, but are often poorly described by classical Brownian motion. The analysis of this data can be controversial because practitioners tend to rely on summary statistics that can be produced by multiple, distinct stochastic process models. Furthermore, these summary statistics inappropriately compress the data, destroying details of non-Brownian characteristics that contain vital clues to mechanisms of transport and interaction. In this talk, I will survey the mathematical and statistical challenges that have arisen from recent work on the movement of foreign agents, including viruses, antibodies, and synthetic microparticle probes, in human mucus. 

This talk is part of the Isaac Newton Institute Seminar Series series.

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