University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Surfaces, Microstructure and Fracture Group > On the development and calibration of an in vitro platform to investigate the response of stem cells over a wide range of pressure and strain rate

On the development and calibration of an in vitro platform to investigate the response of stem cells over a wide range of pressure and strain rate

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Increased interest in post-traumatic effects associated with blast wave exposure, such as traumatic brain injury and heterotopic ossification has led to more interest into how cells respond to dynamic mechanical loadings. It is well known that in a blast scenario, the high magnitudes of pressure and the rate of deformation experienced by the cells lead to acute damage that contribute to a wide range of deleterious effects on cellular functionalities and sometimes fatal outcomes on viability. Few researchers, however, have addressed the problem of how cells and their components respond to stress waves at pressure and strain rate approaching blast injury conditions. The objectives of this study are to introduce and validate a novel in vitro platform compatible with living cells to investigate the effects of high-pressure stress waves across a wide range of strain rates. Specifically, an hermetically sealed sample holder was designed to hold a 3D tissue construct during mechanical loading on three different mechanical loading devices. The sample holder was investigated as regards its abilities to fulfil both physical and biological requirements needed to ensure the transmission of the stress pulse through the entire system whilst keeping the biological material free of contamination. Multiaxial compression single pulse loading of periosteum stem cells embedded in hydrogel scaffold was performed at different magnitudes of stress under quasi-static, intermediate and high rate of loading. Post-pressurisation viability assay and sub-cellular components microscopy were performed in order to examine and correlate the cellular response after mechanical insult to the input mechanical loadings.

This talk is part of the Surfaces, Microstructure and Fracture Group series.

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