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Archaeology and genetics in Oceania: the history of humans and their crops in the Pacific

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  • User Andrew Clarke (McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research) World_link
  • ClockThursday 19 January 2017, 19:30-21:00
  • HouseCottenham Village College.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Vicki Harley.

All Welcome

The Pacific Ocean (or Oceania) is a fascinating place to study human history. It contains some 25,000 islands – most were either inhabited in prehistory or show evidence of prehistoric human contact. Oceania is the location of some of the oldest human migration events (e.g. New Guinea) and some of the most recent (e.g. New Zealand). This lecture will describe how archaeology and genetics are being combined to understand how humans have moved across the Pacific, the tempo and mode of crop selection, and how agriculture has spread across a vast island world.

This talk is part of the Fen Edge Archaeology Group series.

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