University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Pedagogy, Language, Arts & Culture in Education (PLACE) Group Seminars > Webinars for Professional Development in the Arts series 13: Conceptualising Music Education for Social Inclusion

Webinars for Professional Development in the Arts series 13: Conceptualising Music Education for Social Inclusion

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This presentation discusses and conceptualises the uses of music and music education activities as a way to address social inclusion and respect for diversity. A review of the literature outlining examples internationally will be provided. It is apparent that active engagement in group musical activities in- and out-of-school has been and continues to be an effective means to develop a sense of belonging with young people. The presentation will draw on the presenter’s research on cross-community settings in Northern Ireland and migrant children in Scotland, available Open Access at the above links. Implications and ideas for further research will be considered.

Dr. Oscar Odena is Reader in Education at the Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change, University of Glasgow. Previously he held posts at universities including Hertfordshire, Brighton and Queen’s University Belfast, where he completed a study on the potential of music education to diminish cross-community tensions. His areas of expertise comprise qualitative research approaches, social inclusion and music education. He is past Co-Chair of the Research Commission of the International Society for Music Education (2012-2014) and serves on the boards of leading journals and the review colleges of the Irish Research Council and the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This talk is part of the Pedagogy, Language, Arts & Culture in Education (PLACE) Group Seminars series.

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