University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Wolfson Research Event 2017 > Analyzing the Effects of Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining on Agriculture for Policy Action; Evidence from Prestea Mining Region, Ghana

Analyzing the Effects of Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining on Agriculture for Policy Action; Evidence from Prestea Mining Region, Ghana

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  • UserFrancis Arthur – MPhil Student, Oxford Department of International Development, St Antony’s College, University of Oxford
  • ClockFriday 24 February 2017, 14:50-15:00
  • HouseLee Hall, Wolfson College Cambridge.

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This paper explores the effects of artisanal and small-scale gold mining on agriculture in Prestea mining region, Ghana, and suggests policy actions. A cross-sectional survey with both qualitative and quantitative research design was employed. Simple random and purposive sampling techniques with 386 participants were used. The study found that artisanal and small-scale gold mining is constantly destroying grazing fields of livestock, food crops and tree crops (such as cocoa and palm oil trees), and has also caused reduction in food availability and shortages of agricultural foodstuffs. These are as a result of the destruction of farms or farmlands and the shift of occupation from agriculture to small-scale gold mining. It, therefore, renders many farmers landless and causes them to lose their household income. However, recognizing the significance of agriculture to both individuals and the nation, agricultural strategies have to be developed to protect farmers and the agricultural sector in the mining regions. The government, mining and mineral commission, and agricultural agencies must provide practical measures to ensure the sustainability of the environment and agricultural production systems in the mining regions in Ghana.

This talk is part of the Wolfson Research Event 2017 series.

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