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Brain mechanisms underlying the subjective experience of remembering

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Remembering personally experienced events involves reactivating sensory and perceptual event features, and the thoughts and feelings we had when the event occurred, and integrating them into a conscious experience during retrieval. It makes possible a number of decision making abilities, such as distinguishing events that actually occurred from those we might have imagined or been told about. Although a great deal is known about the cognitive and neural processes that enable us to recall a word list, for example, considerably less is known about the processes underlying the subjective experience of remembering. In this talk, I will consider evidence from functional neuroimaging and patient lesion studies addressing the contribution of different brain regions to the subjective experience of remembering.

This talk is part of the Zangwill Club series.

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