University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Carbon Nanotube > CNT@Cambridge 2007 Symposium – A Mini-Symposium on the Science and Application of Carbon Nanotubes

CNT@Cambridge 2007 Symposium – A Mini-Symposium on the Science and Application of Carbon Nanotubes

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Short Description A one-day symposium where leading scientists from Cambridge and other institutions in Europe will gather to exchange ideas about the science and application of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs). CNTs are cylinders of rolled graphene sheets and they belong to a relatively new class of fibrous materials with a length scale in nanometer (i.e. one billionth of a metre). They can potentially be used in a wide range of high-performance applications ranging from nano-composites and electronic devices to drug delivery.

Keynote Speakers
  • Prof. Gehan Amaratunga (University of Cambridge, UK)
  • Prof. Christian Bailly (Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium)
  • Prof. Francisco Chinesta (CNRS -ENSAM, France)
  • Dr. James Elliot (University of Cambridge, UK)
  • Prof. Kostas Kostarelos (University of London, UK)
  • Prof. Malcolm Mackley (University of Cambridge, UK)
  • Prof. Bill Milne (University of Cambridge, UK)
  • Ms. Ottilia Saxl (Institute of Nanotechnology, UK)
  • Prof. Eugene Terentjev (University of Cambridge, UK)
  • Prof. Mark Welland (Nanoscience Centre, University of Cambridge, UK)
  • Prof. Alan Windle (University of Cambridge, UK)
Registration Fees (include coffee breaks, buffet lunch, and closing reception with wines and canapés)
  • Undergraduate and Postgraduate Students: FREE
  • Postdoctorals and Academic staff: GBP 25
  • Industrial visitors and others: GBP 100 per delegate

Registration Website: http://www.cnt-cam2007.co.uk/

This talk is part of the Carbon Nanotube series.

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