University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Zangwill Club > The role of phasic dopamine signalling in the determination of agency and the discovery of novel actions

The role of phasic dopamine signalling in the determination of agency and the discovery of novel actions

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Tea & cakes available in 2nd floor Seminar Room from 4pm

An influential concept in contemporary computational neuroscience is the reward prediction error hypothesis of phasic dopaminergic function. It maintains that midbrain dopaminergic neurones signal the occurrence of unpredicted reward, which is used in appetitive learning to reinforce existing actions that most often lead to reward. However, the availability of limited afferent sensory processing and the precise timing of dopaminergic signals suggest they may instead play a central role in identifying which aspects of context and behavioural output are critical in causing unpredicted events.

This talk is part of the Zangwill Club series.

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