University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Engineering Department Structures Research Seminars > Reinforced concrete half-joint structures - or why playing Tetris is not always good for structural engineers

Reinforced concrete half-joint structures - or why playing Tetris is not always good for structural engineers

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The deterioration of our existing infrastructure network represents a significant problem. The costs associated with the repair and maintenance of ageing assets are increasing rapidly. Classes of structures such as reinforced concrete half-joint bridges are particularly critical.

A half-joint, or dapped-end, is the support end of a structural element where a sudden reduction in depth forms a protruding nib. It is a very common type of support in precast bridges, as it simplifies buildability and reduces the overall structural depth. However, half-joints represent complex disturbed regions and their behaviour was not well understood in the past. Moreover, they are very vulnerable to deterioration due to corrosion of the internal steel reinforcement. Assessing their residual structural capacity is very challenging.

The objective of this project is to develop more accurate assessment methods for half-joint structures to guide the management of the infrastructure network. The experimental programme focuses on the studying the structural consequences of corrosion and deterioration-induced failure modes in reinforced concrete half-joints.

This talk is part of the Engineering Department Structures Research Seminars series.

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