University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Biochemistry Friday Seminars > Biochemistry Friday Seminar - Putting the spotlight on the molecular choreography of viral RNAs

Biochemistry Friday Seminar - Putting the spotlight on the molecular choreography of viral RNAs

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Alexander Borodavka.

Rotaviruses are highly contagious viruses that infect children worldwide, causing >200,000 deaths annually. A single infectious rotavirus particle contains 11 unique RNA segments used to store its genetic material, serving as a multi-page instruction manual for building new virus particles. It is a mystery how rotaviruses select and package 11 distinct segments, ensuring that each newly built virus has a complete set of instructions for infecting cells. Our lab uses a combination of single-molecule imaging, fluorescence spectroscopy and RNA structure probing tools to crack the code of how rotaviruses select and package a complete set of 11 RNA segments. Understanding the mechanism of segment counting will accelerate our efforts to design improved rotavirus vaccines that offer greater protection, and identify new targets for developing antiviral drugs.

This talk is part of the Biochemistry Friday Seminars series.

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