University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Political Ecology Group meetings > Invasive species and ecological imperialism in South America. Current interactions between wood industry, wild boars, perroquets and hunters in Uruguay

Invasive species and ecological imperialism in South America. Current interactions between wood industry, wild boars, perroquets and hunters in Uruguay

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Uruguay is a cattle country. The colonization of Uruguay (and much of the Southern Cone of America) was based on the production and export of leather and meat of exotic species deliberately introduced by humans: cows. Livestock is currently the main productive activity of Uruguay. However, for about 30 years new species introduced by humans such as eucalyptus and soybeans, are changing the national productive map, competing with livestock as the country’s main productive activities. At the same time that the area of expansion of these new species begins to increase, wild boars and perroquets were declared national pests. Recently the wild boar is being fought very strongly because in addition to being a productive threat, it is an exotic environmental threat. In this presentation I analyze the postcolonial processes that have generated new ecological assemblages between exotic and native species, leading to some being considered plague and others almost “sacred.” Specifically I focus on fighting wild boar and the discursive roots based on speeches around production, conservation and biosecurity.

This talk is part of the Political Ecology Group meetings series.

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