University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Babraham Seminar > Putting people before projects: Everything THAT nature communications paper got wrong about scientific success and mentorship

Putting people before projects: Everything THAT nature communications paper got wrong about scientific success and mentorship

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  • UserDr Laura M. Huckins; Pamela Sklar Division of Psychiatric Genomics, Department of Psychiatry, Department of Genetic and Genomic Sciences, Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NYC, USA
  • ClockMonday 14 December 2020, 15:00-16:00
  • HouseOnline via zoom.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Matt Humphries.

This webinar will be online via zoom. No registration required.

Please click here to join the live webinar:

https://zoom.us/j/91042234569

Link to the Nature paper – https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-19723-8

The Huckins’ Lab - Our over-arching goal is to develop and apply complex statistical algorithms to probe the genetic, epigenetic, and higher-level multi-omic basis of understudied psychiatric disorders and trajectories.

We focus on historically under-studied and vulnerable populations, with an emphasis anorexia nervosa (AN) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following interpersonal violence and sexual assault.

The purpose of our research is ultimately to help understand psychiatric disorders. We hope that our results will lead to a deeper understanding of neurobiology; better treatments and medications; more effective, appropriate and timely interventions; and a relief of the shame, blame, guilt and fear surrounding poorly understood diagnoses.

We will achieve these goals by asking thoughtful, nuanced questions. We will answer these questions by designing and applying statistical algorithms. These algorithms will encoporate multi-layered data, tying together variation in the genome, transcriptome, epigenome, microbiome, and population phenome.

This talk is part of the Babraham Seminar series.

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