University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > FERSA Lunchtime Sessions > The Darwinian evolution of a book wielding Science teacher:a guide to incorporating children's literature in the secondary Science classroom

The Darwinian evolution of a book wielding Science teacher:a guide to incorporating children's literature in the secondary Science classroom

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My experience of working within secondary education has shown me that an impassioned Science teacher sharing her love of reading is an unexpected and inspiring hook for pupils. In this session I will share three key ways in which literature can be used to invigorate a Science lesson. Firstly, how to help pupils find their own distinctive voice. All scientists need to communicate; with the public, funding bodies, their peers. I teach pupils how the mechanics of non-fiction texts perform an identical role to the beginning, middle and end of fiction tales and help them in writing dynamic openings which demand attention. Secondly how can storytelling techniques be used to powerful effect by the teacher? Finally, real science is just as fantastic and enthralling as Pullman’s mulefa species which coexist with trees or the Capitol’s genetically modified jabberjays in the Hunger Games trilogy. How can examples from children’s fiction be incorporated seamlessly within existing schemes of work to spark animated discussions and raise achievement levels?

This session will be valuable to all teachers interested in encouraging creativity within their classrooms and anyone with a general interest in children’s literature.

This talk is part of the FERSA Lunchtime Sessions series.

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