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How the Global Fund revolutionised the fight against AIDS, TB and Malaria: What worked, what didn’t, and what next? - Humanitarian Centre Annual Lecture

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Centre For Global Equality .

Please register by 30 April to attend: http://annuallecture2013.eventbrite.com

The Humanitarian Centre is pleased to announce that this year’s Annual Lecture will be given by Bernard Rivers, founder of Aidspan, the Independent Observer of the Global Fund. He will be speaking on the topic of: “How the Global Fund revolutionised the fight against AIDS , TB and Malaria: What worked, what didn’t, and what next?”

PLEASE NOTE THE REVISED TIMES COMPARED TO INITIAL PUBLICITY

Changes are in order to allow those interested in attending both our Annual Lecture and the Inaugural Lecture of the Wellcome Trust-Cambridge Centre for Global Health Research, earlier in the evening, to do so. The WT-CCGHR event is a 5-10 minute walk from Emmanuel College.

The lecture will be followed by a networking reception with displays by the network’s member organisations. This is an excellent opportunity to find out more about the Humanitarian Centre’s members and mingle with others with an interest in reducing global poverty and inequality.

Please register to attend: http://annuallecture2013.eventbrite.com

The lecture will be followed by a networking reception. This is an excellent opportunity to find out more about the Humanitarian Centre’s member organisations and mingle with others with an interest in reducing global poverty and inequality.

To register and for more information: http://annuallecture2013.eventbrite.com

UPDATED Timetable:

(5:30-6:15pm Humanitarian Centre Members’ Q&A with the speaker postponed to a later date, to be finalised soon)

7-8:15 pm Annual lecture

8:15-9:00 pm Networking drinks reception

Talk abstract:

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS , Tuberculosis and Malaria, which disburses $3 billion a year, may well be the world’s most innovative funding mechanism. When Kofi Annan called for it to be established in 2002, he proposed, and others quickly agreed, that the Fund’s voting board members should include not just governments of developed and developing countries, but also representatives of foundations, the private sector, civil society and people living with the three diseases. The Fund’s other distinctive features include that it is remarkably transparent; that countries that receive the Fund’s grants control the projects that the grants finance; that poor performance by grant implementers can lead to reduced funding; and that the Fund has a wholly independent Office of the Inspector General that vigorously looks for and publishes evidence of misuse of funds.

About the speaker:

Bernard Rivers is a UK-born economist who founded Aidspan (www.aidspan.org) in 2002, ran it until 2012, and now serves as Aidspan’s first Senior Fellow. During 2013 he also serves as a visiting fellow at Cambridge University, with affiliations to Queens’ College, the Institute of Public Health, and the Centre of Development Studies. His main project at Cambridge is a comparative analysis of the governance methods of the Global Fund and other multilateral grant-making institutions. He is also a Consulting Research Fellow at the Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House).

Aidspan is an international non-governmental organisation (NGO) based in Kenya that serves as an independent watchdog of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS , TB and Malaria. Aidspan is best known for its newsletter Global Fund Observer, which has 10,000 subscribers.

We are grateful for the generous support of Emmanuel College in hosting the lecture and reception, and to Dr Richard Barnes, the acting master, for chairing the event.

This talk is part of the Centre for Global Equality series.

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